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Getting ahead of infectious diseases with advanced technology

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23 September 2021

The predictive power of genetics, genomics, and AI holds the key to transforming medical discovery for the better, shaping how diseases are both prevented and treated.

Significant investments in artificial intelligence and machine learning, and the use of functional genomics – plus working closely with our partners – enable us to uncover new opportunities in science and medicine.



Even before the pandemic, infectious diseases had a major impact on morbidity and mortality around the globe. However, the lessons learned from the pandemic have put front and centre the need for approaching infectious diseases with both vaccines and medicines. Increasingly, scientific breakthroughs and technology advances have meant the line between the two has blurred: some vaccines work like medicines and some medicines can help prevent reoccurrence of disease. The end result: helping to save more lives.

This dual approach is something we have long been working towards at GSK across a wide array of diseases including HIV, RSV [Respiratory Syncytial Virus] and flu and it will be a key strategy for years to come.

Our HIV focus isn’t just about people living with HIV, it’s about communities that are vulnerable to or impacted by HIV. That’s why we are looking at medicines that already have transformative benefits for treatment and evaluating their potential for preventing HIV. We think this could be a game-changer in our efforts to end the HIV epidemic.

Dr. Kim Smith, Head of R&D, ViiV Healthcare

Within our reach there are vaccines that can work as both prevention and treatment – all thanks to recent advances in science, the progress we’ve seen in vaccine technology, and the fact that our understanding of the immune system and pathogens is better than ever before.

Roger Connor, President, GSK Vaccines

When our scientists collaborate with biotechs, academia, and companies around the world, we are able to deliver intellectual synergy that happens when scientists from different disciplines work together toward a common goal.

With all the innovation that is emerging, I think the next decade is going to bring the most important discoveries ever made in science and medicine.

Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer & President of R&D, GSK

This pandemic brought our companies together, but our collaboration extends across a number of programs and a range of respiratory disease. So, our work today will help prepare us and the world for the next pandemic.

Dr. George Scangos, Chief Executive Officer, Vir Biotechnology

Ultimately, it’s the combination of science, talent and technology that will catapult GSK and our partners to be even more ambitious in how we deliver transformational medicines and vaccines for patients.

Read more in The New York Times for an in-depth look at our efforts in the fight against infectious diseases.

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